First of all, blogging is a terrific way to quickly and easily deliver a message. Second, the message is broadcast to millions instantly. So why aren't more associations jumping on this bandwagon? Is it fear? Are they waiting for the technology to begin to phase out before they jump in? Maybe both.

My thought is associations just aren't well enough informed or aware of the power blogging can have. So why aren't people in associations understanding how to leverage blogs? Well, from what we see at associations they just aren't embracing publicly available content. The decision makers are still stuck in the late 90's and early 00's with 'member-only' content and 'forums'. While I completely understand the value in this content, there is an even larger value in publicly accessible content. The delivery, mainly, is what can make accomplishing a mission much easier for this type of content.

The American Medical Association helps doctors help patients by uniting physicians nationwide to work on the most important professional and public health issues.

The mission of the Association is to prevent and cure…To fulfill this mission, the American Diabetes Association funds research, publishes scientific findings, provides information and other services to people with diabetes, their families, health professionals and the public.

So where are these blogs? I'd love to read more on diabetes from the public authorities on the disease. Instead all my choices are just people living with the disease. Again, these blogs are very interesting and valuable, but if I were to come across an association's blog that was tightly integrated into their website, it would probably drawn me to other areas of their website, which would lure me to the mission (I always read orgs mission statements). Then, finally, they would at the very least have me thinking about the org and joining. Instead, I end up on http://www.kweaver.org/blog/index.html or http://www.diabetesmine.com/ just surfing the web.

So what can we do about this? Do we need to shove blogging more down the throats of boards and executive directors? How can we get more associations involved in this huge value-add?